Sensis to Sell In-Game Advertising

Interesting nugget of information this morning in MediaPost’s Online Media Daily:

In-game advertising network IGA Worldwide Inc. has expanded its global footprint to include two exclusive sales partnerships in Australia and Canada. IGA will be working with Sensis, Australia’s leading information resource and Access Marketing, an independent Canadian media company. The deal broadens IGA’s global reach, while creating opportunities for local and regional advertisers in Australia and Canada to reach gamers in the 18-34 demographic on IGA’s worldwide network. IGA Worldwide presently generates more than 200 million impressions per week.

The press release adds: ” The deals will see Sensis’ digital advertising arm MediaSmart representing IGA Worldwide’s in-game advertising opportunities exclusively in the Australian market, through games inside of IGA‘s Radial Network. The partnership puts MediaSmart in a strong position to capitalize on the distinctive in-game advertising channel which is poised for further growth in the Australian market and bound to play an influential role in future media buying. Sensis provides advertising services to thousands of leading Australian businesses and this partnership underscores the appeal of in-game ads as a way to reach consumers for businesses of any size.”

What it means: smart move by Sensis. Knowing full well that videogames are yet another media entry door, they are going to leverage their existing MediaSmart sales team to promote local and national advertisers via in-game advertising. A great way to reach the 15-30 year-olds.

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Forbes Online Success does not Cannibalize Print; Future Focus on Local Business News

I had missed that news last week:

The head of Forbes.com told an industry conference that online success has not come at the expense of the print product. Speaking at the OPA forum for the future, in London today, James Spanfeller, president and CEO of Forbes.com, told delegates that his site drew 16 million unique visitors per month.

“The success of Forbes.com has not come at the expense of our print product, in fact the two media platforms have been a great complement to each other… we’ve had all the magazine content on the site for ten years, from launch, during that time readership for the magazine has increased. “The strategy has paid off handsomely for us not only in terms of increasing readership for the print product but we have also seen tremendous uptake of folks reading our sites.”

Mr Spanfeller said that growth was based on the recognition of the Forbes brand rather than a specific single delivery platform. “The manner by which people find our content is less important than having a brand that stands out and that people recognise.” He added that Forbes was prepared for a platform agnostic publishing world where the focus was on providing business news on a local basis. He said Forbes had just launched a Polish version and further local language services with geographically specific content were planned. He added that Forbes was investing heavily in creating original video.(…)

(via Journalism.co.uk )

What it means: it’s common knowledge in the industry that Forbes has done a very good job with their online properties, building specific content for the Web and launching vertical sites like Forbes Autos . What’s interesting is that they say it hasn’t dented their offline revenues and that’s good news for an industry that has seen its share of problems recently. Premiere Magazine is shutting down its print edition in the US but will keep operating its web site. In the videogames industry, Computer Games Magazine, the second oldest pc-focused game magazine, has apparently been shut down by publisher TheGlobe.com. (Personal note: I’ve known Steve Bauman, the editor-in-chief, since my days at UbiSoft in the ’90s).

Coming back to Forbes, according to this New York Times article, “the Forbes site attracted almost $55 million in revenue in 2005, the most among business publications” The Times article also debates whether they have as much traffic as they claim, bringing back to the surface the whole third-party measurement issue. “Some competitors argue that Forbes.com’s popularity derives in part from racy, provocative or wealth-obsessed lifestyle features that have little to do with traditional business news — examples from this year include “The Hottest Billionaire Heiresses,” “Top Topless Beaches” and “America’s Drunkest Cities.” Those kinds of articles, unlikely to appear in Forbes magazine, may be a small fraction of those that Forbes.com posts each day, but they are often featured on mass-market Web portals.” I call that smart marketing. As long as you don’t over-extend and dilute too much your brand, there are a lot of things that can be done differently online. You want to capture those eyeballs.

Update1: InfoWorld kills print edition, will focus on online. Owen Thomas from the Business 2.0 blog says: “I’ve heard from IDG insiders that IDG is keeping other print titles on life support, on the theory that the print edition adds brand awareness and gravitas to the websites.”

Update2: Time Warner announces that Life Magazine will be shut down

Meta-Praized: Google & Outdoor Advertising, 100M IE7 Installs, DRM isn’t about Piracy, The Future of Telephony, Newspaper blogs, and more

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last few weeks. By clicking on that link, you can always follow what’s currently on our mind:

  • “Google plans street advertising presence” via Engadget
  • “Google Talk to Interoperate with AIM This Year” via the Google Operating System blog
  • “Microsoft Hits 100 Million IE7 Installs” via BetaNews
  • “Privately, Hollywood admits DRM isn’t about piracy” via Ars Technica
  • “Small Town News Station Heads to YouTube” via SplashCast Media
  • “MTV to buy RateMyProfessors.com” in News.com
  • “Asterisk: The Future of Telephony” via linux.inet.hr
  • “Google (Google Checkout) breaks ceasefire with eBay” via Valleywag
  • “Big Media’s Crush on Social Networking” in the New York Times
  • “Google Inc. is currently in negotiations to purchase Adscape Media (videogame advertising)” in CNN Money
  • “Traffic to newspaper blogs soars” via MarketWatch

Meta-Praized: Google & Outdoor Advertising, 100M IE7 Installs, DRM isn’t about Piracy, The Future of Telephony, Newspaper blogs, and more

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last few weeks. By clicking on that link, you can always follow what’s currently on our mind:

  • “Google plans street advertising presence” via Engadget
  • “Google Talk to Interoperate with AIM This Year” via the Google Operating System blog
  • “Microsoft Hits 100 Million IE7 Installs” via BetaNews
  • “Privately, Hollywood admits DRM isn’t about piracy” via Ars Technica
  • “Small Town News Station Heads to YouTube” via SplashCast Media
  • “MTV to buy RateMyProfessors.com” in News.com
  • “Asterisk: The Future of Telephony” via linux.inet.hr
  • “Google (Google Checkout) breaks ceasefire with eBay” via Valleywag
  • “Big Media’s Crush on Social Networking” in the New York Times
  • “Google Inc. is currently in negotiations to purchase Adscape Media (videogame advertising)” in CNN Money
  • “Traffic to newspaper blogs soars” via MarketWatch

Meta-Praized: Social Charity, Clustering, Is Google Too Big?, IM Predictions for 2007, Second Life, World of Warcraft, Revver, Guba

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last few weeks. By clicking on that link, you can always follow what’s on our mind.

Burger King X-Box Games Go Double-Platinum

(via Joystiq and Gamasutra)

“What burger-backed trio of minigames reached the 2-million-in-sales mark faster than Gears of War (the fastest-selling Xbox-exclusive ever)? That’s right … Burger King’s Value Meal threesome! Well, technically, 2 million is the number of combined sales (of the three games: Pocketbike Racer, Big Bumpin’, and Sneak King); and each is only $3.99 with the purchase of a (BK Value) meal.”

“Gamasutra recently conducted an interview with Blitz Games’ Philip Oliver (the game developer) in which he spoke in detal about the Burger King advergame deal, noting: “Well, I think Burger King obviously has been looking at the fact that they’re trying to connect with today’s youth, and that means gamers, fundamentally.”

What it means: what a great way to rejuvenate your brand image while targeting an age group that’s difficult to reach.

The 3D Web is Coming!

second_life.jpgIn my post Second Life Killer ? Microsoft Live Local Releases 3D models of US Cities, I wrote that this Microsoft launch was the beginning of a new 3D world. In his post “Google, Microsoft And The ‘3-D Web’‘ in Search Engine Watch, Greg Sterling posits that “symbolically it is (… the beginning of the 3-D Web…)”

I also like the way he thinks this might be the evolution of Search: “The question of what’s next in search is often posed and left unanswered, because it’s very hard to image what might replace the ubiquitous text box. But, in my opinion, a partial answer is starting to emerge. It involves variables of place (local/geo-coding), rich media (images, video, 3-D) and community.”

BTW, Seamus McCauley seems to think that Microsoft Virtual Earth is also a Second Life Killer

What it means: we’re now seeing the tip of the iceberg in terms of convergence of videogames and the Web. It will an impact on search as well.

Harry – What it also appears to mean: that it isn’t the video gaming industry that will give us the 3D web. I don’t see EA, Activison or Nintendo on the list…