Google has Launched Pay-Per-Call in India

I found a nice nugget of information in this Business Week article about pay-per-call:

“Google is currently at work on its own pay-per-call service, which already works as a part of Google Maps but hasn’t yet been offered to U.S. small businesses. In that system, users click on an icon for a restaurant, enter their numbers, and an outside provider connects the user and the establishment. The company has already launched a formal pay-per-call product in India, says Rohit Dahawan, a product manager for Google that oversees the click-to-call and pay-per-call products. And they’re working on more such products, to be launched in the next several months in the U.S. They’ve also started tracking calls as part of their updated small-business AdWords service.”

Digging a bit deeper, I found (via Search Engine Roundtable) this September 2006 DigitalPoint forum thread that talks about it:

“These ads are charged at about 45 INR (Indian Rupees) (about $1.00). When somebody clicks on the ad, you get a text box where you can input your number, the moment you submit google connects a call between you and the advertiser and let both of them speak for as much time as they want. So advertiser only spends about 45 INR, irrespective of the calling time. One can call you from any part of the world and these charges will remain same. Also if the call get disconnected in first 10 seconds, the advertiser pays nothing. This service is currently in beta and currently google seem to have offered access to pay per call to some big players in the indian .com industry.”

What it means: I was not aware of this Google pay-per-call trial. They are clearly using the click-to-call functionality they deployed earlier in 2006 to enable the pay-per-call model. I really believe in this call-based ad model (it was part of my 2007 predictions) but I’m not sure this is the right way to execute. Click-to-call is not as seamless as replacing a merchant’s usual number with a trackable phone number. But you know what? If Google is trialling pay-per-call, you’d better be thinking about it as well if your media is all about calls. BTW, I also love the idea of expiring phone numbers for the classifieds business (like Craigsnumber).

Google has Launched Pay-Per-Call in India

I found a nice nugget of information in this Business Week article about pay-per-call:

“Google is currently at work on its own pay-per-call service, which already works as a part of Google Maps but hasn’t yet been offered to U.S. small businesses. In that system, users click on an icon for a restaurant, enter their numbers, and an outside provider connects the user and the establishment. The company has already launched a formal pay-per-call product in India, says Rohit Dahawan, a product manager for Google that oversees the click-to-call and pay-per-call products. And they’re working on more such products, to be launched in the next several months in the U.S. They’ve also started tracking calls as part of their updated small-business AdWords service.”

Digging a bit deeper, I found (via Search Engine Roundtable) this September 2006 DigitalPoint forum thread that talks about it:

“These ads are charged at about 45 INR (Indian Rupees) (about $1.00). When somebody clicks on the ad, you get a text box where you can input your number, the moment you submit google connects a call between you and the advertiser and let both of them speak for as much time as they want. So advertiser only spends about 45 INR, irrespective of the calling time. One can call you from any part of the world and these charges will remain same. Also if the call get disconnected in first 10 seconds, the advertiser pays nothing. This service is currently in beta and currently google seem to have offered access to pay per call to some big players in the indian .com industry.”

What it means: I was not aware of this Google pay-per-call trial. They are clearly using the click-to-call functionality they deployed earlier in 2006 to enable the pay-per-call model. I really believe in this call-based ad model (it was part of my 2007 predictions) but I’m not sure this is the right way to execute. Click-to-call is not as seamless as replacing a merchant’s usual number with a trackable phone number. But you know what? If Google is trialling pay-per-call, you’d better be thinking about it as well if your media is all about calls. BTW, I also love the idea of expiring phone numbers for the classifieds business (like Craigsnumber).

Meta-Praized: Google & Outdoor Advertising, 100M IE7 Installs, DRM isn’t about Piracy, The Future of Telephony, Newspaper blogs, and more

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last few weeks. By clicking on that link, you can always follow what’s currently on our mind:

  • “Google plans street advertising presence” via Engadget
  • “Google Talk to Interoperate with AIM This Year” via the Google Operating System blog
  • “Microsoft Hits 100 Million IE7 Installs” via BetaNews
  • “Privately, Hollywood admits DRM isn’t about piracy” via Ars Technica
  • “Small Town News Station Heads to YouTube” via SplashCast Media
  • “MTV to buy RateMyProfessors.com” in News.com
  • “Asterisk: The Future of Telephony” via linux.inet.hr
  • “Google (Google Checkout) breaks ceasefire with eBay” via Valleywag
  • “Big Media’s Crush on Social Networking” in the New York Times
  • “Google Inc. is currently in negotiations to purchase Adscape Media (videogame advertising)” in CNN Money
  • “Traffic to newspaper blogs soars” via MarketWatch

Meta-Praized: Google & Outdoor Advertising, 100M IE7 Installs, DRM isn’t about Piracy, The Future of Telephony, Newspaper blogs, and more

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last few weeks. By clicking on that link, you can always follow what’s currently on our mind:

  • “Google plans street advertising presence” via Engadget
  • “Google Talk to Interoperate with AIM This Year” via the Google Operating System blog
  • “Microsoft Hits 100 Million IE7 Installs” via BetaNews
  • “Privately, Hollywood admits DRM isn’t about piracy” via Ars Technica
  • “Small Town News Station Heads to YouTube” via SplashCast Media
  • “MTV to buy RateMyProfessors.com” in News.com
  • “Asterisk: The Future of Telephony” via linux.inet.hr
  • “Google (Google Checkout) breaks ceasefire with eBay” via Valleywag
  • “Big Media’s Crush on Social Networking” in the New York Times
  • “Google Inc. is currently in negotiations to purchase Adscape Media (videogame advertising)” in CNN Money
  • “Traffic to newspaper blogs soars” via MarketWatch

Meta-Praized: Computers in 2026, Auditions on YouTube, Time’s Person of the Year Plus: Jajah, CragisNumber, NYC Taxis, Nasa, Ask X & BBC

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last 7 days. Feel free to add us as a friend: PraizedDotCom

Meta-Praized: Computers in 2026, Auditions on YouTube, Time’s Person of the Year Plus: Jajah, CragisNumber, NYC Taxis, Nasa, Ask X & BBC

Meta-Praized is a collection of links & stories we’ve “dugg” on Digg.com in the last 7 days. Feel free to add us as a friend: PraizedDotCom

Local & Social Media Predictions for 2007

I’ve recently discussed in this blog a list of online media predictions for 2007. I’ve decided to take the plunge and offer my own predictions in the Local and Social Media space for the year to come.

1) Atomization: 2007 will see the acceleration of content/functions/applications atomization (decentralization) via the adoption of multiple syndication methods like RSS, XML and APIs by a majority of web sites.

2) Verticalization: The success of generalist social networks and online video sites in 2006 means that we will see the arrival of a multitude of new specialized players in these two fields.

3) RSS: a clear business model for RSS will emerge. It will start replacing e-mail marketing as a way to communicate directly (and better) to your customers

4) Local will become more social / Social will become more local: A good example of the later is the addition of maps (often Google Maps, the poster child for Atomization!) in FiveLimes or Flickr.

5) Traditional Media will continue to realize that they desperately need to capture eyeballs online, leading to more online acquisitions and/or investments.

6) Long distance & local calls will continue their move towards free. Model might actually reverse itself and we might finally see the strong emergence of pay-per-call as a legitimate lead model for advertisers.

7) Traditional media will create SEO job positions. Search Engine Optimization is a key success factor for traditional media to be well positioned in search engines. Innovative companies will create Social Media Optimization (SMO) positions.

8) Video Monetization: a clear business model will emerge. Either Google’s acquisition of YouTube or the launch of the Venice Project (don’t bet against Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstrom…)

9) The proliferation of destination sites without clear business models will lead a lot of them to adopt the B2B business model, i.e. software licensing or ASP to traditional media companies.

There you go! Anything you would have added? Do you agree, disagree?