James Surowiecki in Montreal!

James Surowiecki, of The Wisdom of Crowds fame, will be presenting at the Infopresse360 conference in Montreal on February 27. You can get a sample of what he’s going to be talking about in this video but the general pitch is:

Intelligence alone does not make it possible to grasp all facets of a problem, or examine it from all sides. The author will show that groups are better than individuals when it comes to tackling organizational problems. Acclaimed speaker James Surowiecki will explain his thesis that mass collective wisdom is the best way to move businesses, the economy, communities and nations forward.”

James Surowiecki

What it means: I saw James Surowiecki at the Google Zeitgeist conference in 2005 and it was brilliant. I highly recommend it! As an added bonus, you’ll get to hear one of my former undergrad teachers Stephane Gauvin talking about “Building Relationships in the Social Web Era”. You can get your tickets here.

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What is Tuangou? CrowdShopping: The Next Hottest Segment in Local Search

Read on Springwise.com this morning:

The power of groups, the clout that crowds can exercise to get what they want, is nothing new. What is new, however, is the dizzying ease with which likeminded, action-ready citizens and consumers can now go online and connect, group and ultimately exert influence on a global scale. Our sister website trendwatching.com just published a briefing about crowd clout, and defines the trend as follows: “Online grouping of citizens/consumers for a specific cause, be it political, civic or commercial, aimed at everything from bringing down politicians to forcing suppliers to fork over discounts.”

A fun example of consumers aggregating their intended purchases to get a bargain is tuangou, or team buying, which involves strangers organizing themselves around a specific product or service. Think electronics, home furnishings, cars and so on. These likeminded consumers then meet up in real-world shops and showrooms at a coordinated date and time, literally mobbing the seller and negotiating a group discount on the spot.

Popular Chinese sites that are enabling crowds to first group online and then plan for real world shopmobbing are TeamBuy, Taobao and Liba. Combined, these sites now boast hundreds of thousands of registered members, making money from ad revenues and/or commissions from suppliers who are happy to have the mobs choose their store over a competitor’s.

So who’s going to introduce this concept in San Francisco, Toronto, Sao Paulo, Barcelona or Sydney? The PR value from being the first to do this outside China will be priceless. And may we suggest that the future founders turn it into a hybrid online/offline model, going for maximum reach and visibility?

What it means: This is the next disruptive local search application. Giving the power back to the user for local shopping. It’s RFQ 2.0. It also connects online & offline. Sounds familiar? If you’re operating a traditional local media company, you know what I’m talking about. You’ll obviously need a critical mass of local users to make this work but, if you’re in that space already, you already have one of the key elements of success. Make sure you’re already working on local merchant inventory as well to have product content in your site. BTW, if you like this topic, quickly jump to Trendwatching.com to read the article on crowd clout and read about other opportunities.

What is Tuangou? CrowdShopping: The Next Hottest Segment in Local Search

Read on Springwise.com this morning:

The power of groups, the clout that crowds can exercise to get what they want, is nothing new. What is new, however, is the dizzying ease with which likeminded, action-ready citizens and consumers can now go online and connect, group and ultimately exert influence on a global scale. Our sister website trendwatching.com just published a briefing about crowd clout, and defines the trend as follows: “Online grouping of citizens/consumers for a specific cause, be it political, civic or commercial, aimed at everything from bringing down politicians to forcing suppliers to fork over discounts.”

A fun example of consumers aggregating their intended purchases to get a bargain is tuangou, or team buying, which involves strangers organizing themselves around a specific product or service. Think electronics, home furnishings, cars and so on. These likeminded consumers then meet up in real-world shops and showrooms at a coordinated date and time, literally mobbing the seller and negotiating a group discount on the spot.

Popular Chinese sites that are enabling crowds to first group online and then plan for real world shopmobbing are TeamBuy, Taobao and Liba. Combined, these sites now boast hundreds of thousands of registered members, making money from ad revenues and/or commissions from suppliers who are happy to have the mobs choose their store over a competitor’s.

So who’s going to introduce this concept in San Francisco, Toronto, Sao Paulo, Barcelona or Sydney? The PR value from being the first to do this outside China will be priceless. And may we suggest that the future founders turn it into a hybrid online/offline model, going for maximum reach and visibility?

What it means: This is the next disruptive local search application. Giving the power back to the user for local shopping. It’s RFQ 2.0. It also connects online & offline. Sounds familiar? If you’re operating a traditional local media company, you know what I’m talking about. You’ll obviously need a critical mass of local users to make this work but, if you’re in that space already, you already have one of the key elements of success. Make sure you’re already working on local merchant inventory as well to have product content in your site. BTW, if you like this topic, quickly jump to Trendwatching.com to read the article on crowd clout and read about other opportunities.