Microblogging: The Evolution of Blogging?

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This morning, the fine folks at Mashable wonder “What is FriendFeed’s Effect on Blogging?” Friendfeed, for everyone’s benefit, can be described as a lifestream activity aggregating site.  You basically centralize in one place all of your social media feeds from a variety of services (such as your blog, tweets, YouTube postings, etc.).  You can find mine here.  You also add “friends” and watch the aggregate of all their activities in one place, on the home page of Friendfeed (when you’re signed in).

One of their killer features (which was quickly replicated by Facebook) is the ability to comment on any feed.  Spontaneous conversations can erupt around a variety of topics. The Silicon Valley in-crowd quickly adopted Friendfeed and it seems like many interesting conversations are happening there now . The Friendfeed commenting feature could be equated to what you do in Twitter or in the Facebook status update. In my case, I haven’t adopted Friendfeed as most of social graph doesn’t really hang out there. 

About Friendfeed’s impact on blogging, Mashable says: “I see most of the folks who’ve taken up Twitter, FriendFeed, and other similar services drasticly decrease posting volume, but not to the expense of their substantive editorial or news based posts, it seems. A lot of the personal updates, questions to incite discussion and the observational posts shorten themselves and end up on the lifestream. (…)  In short, micro-blogging isn’t killing traditional blogging, it’s evolving it.”

What it means: I agree.  Blogging is slowly evolving towards a more fragmented world as we see the emergence of new social conversational tools allowing more and more people to start/join conversations in many different places.  More fragmentation means a more complex ecosystem, but also more opportunities for word of mouth. For me, this is still the tip of the iceberg on our way to a completely social Web.

8 thoughts on “Microblogging: The Evolution of Blogging?

  1. Oops! Jeez, my brain must be fried! Yes, Identi.ca (and its related platform Laconi.ca) have to be mentioned (and not just because it’s Montreal-based!). Identi.ca has built a decentralized micro-blogging platform that anyone can reuse to build their own Twitter-like service. Very similar to Praized in concept (centralized DB with a distributed service).

  2. Oops! Jeez, my brain must be fried! Yes, Identi.ca (and its related platform Laconi.ca) have to be mentioned (and not just because it’s Montreal-based!). Identi.ca has built a decentralized micro-blogging platform that anyone can reuse to build their own Twitter-like service. Very similar to Praized in concept (centralized DB with a distributed service).

  3. I always wanted a platform which would like an hybrid of WordPress and Twitter. Sometimes I feel like writing long articles, sometimes not. Sometimes I want to use my computer, sometimes my cell phone. The “winner” (if there is one) will allow all this. I don’t understand why WordPress doesn’t allow this out of the box and I don’t understand why Twitter doesn’t allow longer articles. So people (try to) use two services when it’s clear that 1 service is what they need and want.

  4. I always wanted a platform which would like an hybrid of WordPress and Twitter. Sometimes I feel like writing long articles, sometimes not. Sometimes I want to use my computer, sometimes my cell phone. The “winner” (if there is one) will allow all this. I don’t understand why WordPress doesn’t allow this out of the box and I don’t understand why Twitter doesn’t allow longer articles. So people (try to) use two services when it’s clear that 1 service is what they need and want.

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