Why Newspapers Don’t Own the Local Search Space

Interesting discussion spanning many blogs in the last few days. Subject: why newspapers don’t own the local search space even though they have very rich content.

  1. Rich Skrenta (from Topix.net) discusses the fact that newspapers have very poor search engine optimization for their sites: “Newspapers have a lot of great content, really high quality stuff that cost them a lot of money to develop. Users would love to come across this content, when appropriate. Google would even like to help users find that content, since the users will be happier. But often technical best practices aren’t being followed with the CMS (content management software) and the valuable content fields lie fallow.”
  2. Greg Linden (founder of Findory.com) commenting on Rich’s post says: “Newspapers have remarkable content on businesses and events in their communities. They should be the authoritative source for local. They should be the experts on their communities and reap the traffic from searchers seeking that expertise.”
  3. Don Dodge (from Microsoft) commenting on Greg’s post: “Newspapers have the best local content for local restaurants, movie reviews, local business, school sports, and should be the first search result for any local search. They are not. I think they don’t (own local) because they don’t think globally. They don’t think about how to make their valuable content friendly to search engines.”
  4. Rob Hyndman says: “Newspapers shouldn’t own local search. The problem for newspapers, obviously, is that what used to be an information issue (”what’s going on / where is this thing for sale / what’s a good Italian restaurant / where is the nearest hardware store?”) is becoming a technology issue, and they’re not technologists..
  5. Matthew Ingram (from the Globe & Mail) thinks that: “(Newspapers) can certainly do a heck of a lot better than they are now.”

Update: Ben Saren from CitySquares.com discusses this post in the context of his venture.

What it means: Don added a great comment at the end of his post: “Local search is a huge opportunity. The local newspapers are in a great position to own it…but they don’t. The Yellow Pages could own it online, but they don’t. The big search engines could own it too…but they don’t. It is one of the last great online markets up for grabs.” I agree. I’m a firm believer that every stakeholder in this space owns an important piece of the puzzle but no one has been able to crack the code so far. Win-win partnerships and/or acquisitions are the way to go (full disclosure: I piloted the agreement between Google and Yellow Pages Group when Google Maps Canada was launched). In addition, I think the addition of SEO experts in large media companies is a must (one of my 2007 predictions). Finally, the market is still very much fragmented and a large portion of the local conversation has yet to be captured online. I think we’re still seeing the tip of the iceberg and the next 3 to 5 years will be very exciting!

88 thoughts on “Why Newspapers Don’t Own the Local Search Space

  1. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  2. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  3. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  4. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  5. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  6. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  7. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  8. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  9. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  10. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  11. For a hyper-local company like us, this only validates what we’re doing. I had the chance to meet Don Dodge once a year ago or so, but somehow (and I can’t recall) it didn’t happen – would love the chance.

  12. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  13. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  14. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  15. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  16. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  17. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  18. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  19. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  20. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  21. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  22. Nice summary, Seb.

    As we’ve seen in newspaper (and YP) over the years, the web publishing model is derivative of the print publishing model. Newspapers have grown up on a “disposable content” foundation, and relagated archiving to a tertiary “librarian image application”, not a corporate asset strategy. Making that kind of shift in the midst of a tornado of change and intense budget pressure is no small feat.

    My hunch is the business case is there when you analyse the derivative savings on organic traffic, but it has yet to be articulated, let alone productized inside the industry. I’d bet that the logical “new entrant” is Google, offering a elegant technology solution to leveraging the assets “for you”. A compelling offer, no financial hook, just attach a little slice of that soul,and sign here…

  23. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  24. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  25. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  26. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  27. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  28. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  29. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  30. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  31. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  32. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  33. Hi Ben,

    Thanks for commenting! Now, what do you see in the future for CitySquares? Do you see yourself partnering with traditional media companies (Boston Globe, Superpages, etc.) to leverage their strengths (sales force, traffic, etc.)? Are you looking to partner with other hyperlocal sites throughout the US to build a national hyperlocal network?

  34. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  35. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  36. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  37. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  38. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  39. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  40. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  41. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  42. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  43. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

  44. Sebastien, sorry for the late reply. I didn’t see your response until today. The future of Citysquares is wide open – and I’m very excited about the future of the web in general. In fact, I just posted something on my blog about the future of the web, and that future is in ‘local.’ You can check it out here: http://www.yoursuspect.com/node/29

    Your question is a big one! Certainly partnerships are critical for us. Whether that’s through syndication partnerships, or sales channels and those kinds of partnerships, we must partner to succeed and grow. It also means scaling. Right now, we’re in Boston only. We have plans to scale once the recipe is right. Right now the bread is in the oven, and it’s baking at a cozy 300 degrees. We keep checking, and the dough is rising. But we need to tweak the recipe, add some new ingredients and spice it up. I’m speaking metaphorically again! Force of habit. Point is, we have a lot more work to do here in Boston. Create more stickiness, develop partnerships, more user generated features, more ‘community.’ Then, flip the switch and hit the fast lane.

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